Moments (1980-2011):  A Personal Career Anthology


Before I "turned off the lights" and "closed my office door" on my professional career in marketing and communications for the last time, I sat down and wrote a generic thanks and goodbye to my many colleagues and friends at the U.S. Census where I had worked for 32 years.  And,  the following is the … Continue reading Moments (1980-2011):  A Personal Career Anthology

It’s Graduation Season – Whatever Happened To The Class of ’65?


Paying Homage to a Graduate for a Job Well Done!  This Sunday, we went with our daughter and two of our teenaged grandchildren to a high school graduation party to honor an outstanding senior from our church family whose parents have every right to be very proud of her scholastic accomplishments, God-given talents and exemplary … Continue reading It’s Graduation Season – Whatever Happened To The Class of ’65?

A Christmas Pause During “The Great War” (1914 – 1919)


"No Man's Land" is the term used by soldiers to describe the ground between the two opposing trenches. Its width along the Western Front could vary a great deal. The average distance in most sectors was about 250 yards (230 meters). However, at Guillemont it was only 50 yards (46 meters) whereas at Cambrai it … Continue reading A Christmas Pause During “The Great War” (1914 – 1919)

The Killing Spree . . . Our Ancestral Legacy


Attributing our traits to our ancestors Some days when I look at myself in the mirror, I can see glimpses of my ancestors. My once beautifully brilliant blue eyes; I remember seeing these same eyes in my maternal grandfather, Roy (a Ford from Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina).  Unfortunately, I also get my thick midriff from either or both--my … Continue reading The Killing Spree . . . Our Ancestral Legacy

Old Wounds Reopened…


When asked about how I feel about the August+ events in Ferguson, Missouri, that now have festered and exacerbated old wounds among our people, my only answer can be; "I'm having flashbacks to the happenings in the 1960's, equal rights movements, and the 1990's in Los Angeles and around the United States after the Rodney … Continue reading Old Wounds Reopened…

French Soldier’s Room Remains Unchanged 96 Years After His Death in World War I


The story below touched my heart so much that I felt compelled to share it with my readers.  I can only imagine with great trepidation enduring the loss of a son and honoring him beyond my time on this planet... THIS IS A REBLOG FROM THE GUARDIAN NEWSPAPER: Parents kept room as it was the day he … Continue reading French Soldier’s Room Remains Unchanged 96 Years After His Death in World War I

You Little Dickens!


My mom has told me a story about my relationship with my Cherokee maternal great-grandmother, Mary Susan Morris Ford, ever since I was old enough to talk. Unfortunately, I was only 14 months old when Grandma Susan passed at 73 years old. The story goes like this.  My great-grandmother went to sleep one night and when she … Continue reading You Little Dickens!

Our Native American Heritage–A Follow On


 My post just a few days ago focused on our Native American heritage and the tribes who resided along the borders of the Chesapeake Bay. In my April 24, 2014, and December 3, 2012, posts we looked at our paternal Pocahontas ancestry--First Lady Edith Bolling Galt Wilson (my third cousin), and our lineage to Pocahontas … Continue reading Our Native American Heritage–A Follow On

Flashbacks of the Great Y2K Scare


The Great Y2K Scare The great Y2K scare was spread by scaremongers who thought that the world's computer systems would cease to function on December 31, 1999.  The Y2K problem, aka, "the Millennium bug," "the Y2K bug," or simply "The Year 2000 problem" was both a  digital (computer-related) and non-digital documentation and storage issue.  The quick and easy fix was to convert … Continue reading Flashbacks of the Great Y2K Scare

Archeologists Unearth 40 Confederate Corpses in Virginia Cemetery 154 Years Later


Like you probably, I often come across stories quite by accident that just scream out at me; "share me with other genealogical researchers!" This is another one of those finds.  Interestingly enough, this FOX NEWS story appeared on the United Kingdom's Mail OnLine News.  I'm very sorry that I found it two weeks after our Memorial Day Observances, but … Continue reading Archeologists Unearth 40 Confederate Corpses in Virginia Cemetery 154 Years Later

Remembering Loved Ones for Their Military Services


Home of the Brave About 1-1/2 years ago, I wrote a blog post From Everyday Moments May Come Precious Memories where I noted my feelings, ties, and respect for my mom's grandfather, John Carpenter Ford; her parents, Robert Gideon and Loretta Ford; and her brother, my uncle, John Austin Ford.  The Ford family was intricately involved with me in … Continue reading Remembering Loved Ones for Their Military Services

Our 28th President, His First Lady Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, Pocahontas, and Me


In Celebration of November -  Native American History Month President Woodrow Wilson - husband of my 3rd paternal cousin Edith Bolling Galt Wilson Edith Bolling Galt Wilson was the 35th First Lady of the White House. President Wilson's daughter, Margaret Woodrow Wilson served as First Lady for a brief period following the death of President Wilson's … Continue reading Our 28th President, His First Lady Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, Pocahontas, and Me

…Back to Ole’ Virginny


Although we are officially two weeks into the 2013 Fall Season today (October 3), it is yet another day in a string of unseasonably warm ones with brilliant blue skies, bright sunshine, blossoming flowers, mostly green trees, and temperatures rising again into the mid-80's.  What an opportunity to  'Saisir le jour,' as the French would … Continue reading …Back to Ole’ Virginny

Honoring a Couple of Bolling Cousins, Among America’s Wartime Vets


OBITUARY:  Dr. Robert Hagedorn Bolling--My Third Paternal Cousin (Descendant of Robert Bolling, Jr. of Petersburg, VA (Also cousin to Mrs. Woodrow Wilson, too...) PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania, February 18, 1927 – Dr. Robert Hagedorn Bolling, cousin of Mrs. Woodrow Wilson and Chief Surgeon of the United States, died in the Chestnut Hill Hospital this afternoon following an operation on … Continue reading Honoring a Couple of Bolling Cousins, Among America’s Wartime Vets

Up Close and Personal in my Ancestor’s Home–The American Revolutionary War


Towns of Petersburg, Blandford, and Pocahontas and the suburbs of Ravenscroft and Bollingbrook become one town called Petersburg. (My 7th paternal great grandfather's home.) The colonial town of Petersburg, Virginia, was established by law in 1748. Petersburg elected John Banister (father-in-law of my 7th great grandfather), as it's first mayor in 1781. It achieved the dignity of … Continue reading Up Close and Personal in my Ancestor’s Home–The American Revolutionary War

A Remembering People


Many of my paternal ancestors lived in and around the Chancellorsville Battlefield in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. My great-grandparents, and other family members, in fact, are buried in a small church cemetery on Ely's Ford Road. So these people and events are very near and dear to me. Fredericksburg Remembered Musings on history, public history, and … Continue reading A Remembering People

Patriots Day, Boston 2013: Another Indelible Memory


Reflecting Upon Everyday Moments that became Precious and Often Indelible Memories April 15, 2013--marked the 117th running of the Boston Marathon, the world's oldest annual marathon. The popular event is held annually on Patriots' Day, to commemorate the 1775 battles of Lexington and Concord that kicked off the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783).  Events in Boston … Continue reading Patriots Day, Boston 2013: Another Indelible Memory