“Tapp-ing” Into Lives in 19th Century Spotsylvania County


Local author, Pat Sullivan, penned and published the post that follows on Saturday, September 2014.  It is a far more intimate story of Phenie Tapp's (my second great aunt) family than my post "Bi-racial Relationships of the 60’s–the 1860’s!", penned May 14, 2014. My post tells about my second great-grandmother Catharine Elizabeth "Widow Tapp" Dempsey (descendent … Continue reading “Tapp-ing” Into Lives in 19th Century Spotsylvania County

A Christmas Pause During “The Great War” (1914 – 1919)


"No Man's Land" is the term used by soldiers to describe the ground between the two opposing trenches. Its width along the Western Front could vary a great deal. The average distance in most sectors was about 250 yards (230 meters). However, at Guillemont it was only 50 yards (46 meters) whereas at Cambrai it … Continue reading A Christmas Pause During “The Great War” (1914 – 1919)

The Killing Spree . . . Our Ancestral Legacy


Attributing our traits to our ancestors Some days when I look at myself in the mirror, I can see glimpses of my ancestors. My once beautifully brilliant blue eyes; I remember seeing these same eyes in my maternal grandfather, Roy (a Ford from Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina).  Unfortunately, I also get my thick midriff from either or both--my … Continue reading The Killing Spree . . . Our Ancestral Legacy

Mapping the Spread of American Slavery


Lincoln Mullen is an assistant professor in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University, working on the history of American religions as a digital historian. He writes regularly on his own blog and for the Religion in American History group blog.  He also teaches a course on “Data and Visualization in Digital History” where … Continue reading Mapping the Spread of American Slavery

150th Anniversary–Battle of the Wilderness


My second great-grandfather, Lawrence T. "Larl" Boling married Sarah Tapp, daughter of the now famous Catharine Dempsey "Widow Tapp," (making her my 3rd great grandmother) because she had the misfortune of living on the land that became known as the "Wilderness Battlefield," in Fredericksburg, Virginia, during the Civil War. On Friday, May 2, through Sunday, May … Continue reading 150th Anniversary–Battle of the Wilderness

Oldest-Known Holocaust Survivor Dies; Pianist Was 110


This blog would be incomplete if I failed to include references to the good, the bad, and the uglies of this world. So when I came upon this story of Alice Herz-Sommer, I realized it had all of those features and many more. Alice's spirit, in only moments, touched my heart. I believe she survived … Continue reading Oldest-Known Holocaust Survivor Dies; Pianist Was 110

…Back to Ole’ Virginny


Although we are officially two weeks into the 2013 Fall Season today (October 3), it is yet another day in a string of unseasonably warm ones with brilliant blue skies, bright sunshine, blossoming flowers, mostly green trees, and temperatures rising again into the mid-80's.  What an opportunity to  'Saisir le jour,' as the French would … Continue reading …Back to Ole’ Virginny

Railroaded in Colonial Virginia…


THANKFUL THURSDAY...PART 2 King George County, Port Royal, Virginia We are picking up from Part 1 of this post, dated January 30, 2013, in King George County, Virginia, meandering toward our final destination the Centre Hill Mansion Museum to do the annual January 24th Ghost Walk through the house originally built by Colonel Robert Bolling … Continue reading Railroaded in Colonial Virginia…

The Taylor’s of Culpeper, Virginia (1877-1945)


William Frazier TAYLOR, Jr. William Frazier Taylor, Jr., was my great grand uncle and brother to my paternal great-grandmother, Lottie L. Taylor Chambers. (It's uncanny, my brother John's son, Matthew Burton Boling, four generations later, is the spitting image of William as he appeared in the image on the left.) When William was born on … Continue reading The Taylor’s of Culpeper, Virginia (1877-1945)

Honoring a Couple of Bolling Cousins, Among America’s Wartime Vets


OBITUARY:  Dr. Robert Hagedorn Bolling--My Third Paternal Cousin (Descendant of Robert Bolling, Jr. of Petersburg, VA (Also cousin to Mrs. Woodrow Wilson, too...) PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania, February 18, 1927 – Dr. Robert Hagedorn Bolling, cousin of Mrs. Woodrow Wilson and Chief Surgeon of the United States, died in the Chestnut Hill Hospital this afternoon following an operation on … Continue reading Honoring a Couple of Bolling Cousins, Among America’s Wartime Vets

Found In the Archives from December 8, 1941


Dark, cloudy skies with intermittent heavy downpours to sprinklings of rain make today the perfect day for exploring, researching, and documenting new finds.   Among my many searches today to complement draft posts to come, I entered just two of the 13 Presidential Libraries  (Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S.Truman Libraries), which have their collections online. … Continue reading Found In the Archives from December 8, 1941