Native Americans, White People, and Scottish-Irish Emigrate to North Carolina


From Reuters News: Scots independence polls close, UK’s future in the balance

EDINBURGH – Scotland has voted on whether to stay within the United Kingdom or declare independence to break the 307-year-old union in a finely balanced referendum with global consequences. | Video

Our Unbounded Heritage: 12th Century & Beyond

Native Americans

A recent blog post focused on my maternal great-grandmother Mary Susan MORRIS‘s family–our native american heritage through the Morris branch–and the freshly fallen bricks of a wall I had been up against for years.

White People

Not abandoning this wall, but continuing on, I returned to my maternal great grandfather–Grandmother Susan’s husband, John Carpenter Ford’s (1864-1961) family. Similarly, I found myself at yet another brick wall at his paternal grandfather, Henry Ford (1790-1830)–not the infamous innovator of the automobile industry.

Henry Ford’s birth and death have been recorded as North Carolina in many public family trees.  These trees also show that he and Peggy Rigsby had a son, Robert Jackson Ford, father of my great grandfather, John Carpenter Ford. Henry’s marriage to Peggy is documented in the North Carolina Marriage Index (1741-2004) as 5 Aug 1816 in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina.  Without any evidence to the contrary, we suffice that this Henry is my third great grandfather, who…

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157 Years Later: CSA Sgt. Gideon W. Morris–Our “Battle of Antietam” Survivor


157 Years Later–Our Civil War’s Battle of Antietam Survivor

Our Unbounded Heritage: 12th Century & Beyond

Freshly Fallen Bricks of My Morris Family Wall

After searching to uncover more information about my maternal great grandmother’s (Mary Susan MORRIS Ford) family, I once again stumbled and fell upon freshly fallen bricks of a wall I had pushed against for many years.  Until now, I primarily had focused on the origins of my Native American heritage through the Morris branch.  And then, I immediately shifted my center as a result of revisiting my earlier research in Grandmother Susan’s tree.

Gideon W Morris HeadstoneTo refresh my memory, I reviewed data I had compiled about her father, Gideon W. Morris–my second great grandfather (1837/8-1880)–Virginia born and raised.  It was about 18 months ago when volunteer contributor Michael Hollingsworth first created a findagrave memorial page about Gideon W. Morris and I added his entries to my tree. My newest research, based upon Michael’s findagrave.com page, has helped me remove some significant bricks from my Morris Family wall–thank you, Michael.

It turns out that TheSouthern Historical Society,

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Faith and Football–The Ties That Bind


Faith in Christ – Love of Football

With our son and grandsons scattered across the South Atlantic and Midwest States and one in Europe serving his country, our faith in Christ and love of football continue to keep our family close in heart and spirit.

The National Football League (NFL) has just concluded Week Two of the 2014-2015 season.   And who knew a woman of my age with only a minor interest in football would be anxiously awaiting each week’s reviews?  And why, you might ask?

Well, it all started back around 28 years ago when our eldest son Bob’s most favorite and frequent pastime with our three grandsons was watching, playing, or debating football and even collecting Topps football trading cards.

It wasn’t that all of them rooted for the Washington Redskins–our home team.  No. They were fans of opposing teams.  Our son, Bob, is a New York Giants fan; his eldest son, Joey (28), a Dallas Cowboys and now also Chicago Bears fan.  Joey’s interest in the Dallas Cowboys most likely goes back to the days when his dad was a Redskins fan and the two teams were first recognized as the best rivals in the NFL–and, too, Joey always enjoys and looks for lively debates. Michael (26), has always been a San Francisco 49ers follower, and Andy (22), remains truly loyal to DC’s team even though he hasn’t lived in our area for eight years–And, has only seen the Redskins in a Superbowl one time.  In 1997, in Coach Joe Gibbs second season, they played in Super Bowl XXVI and beat the Buffalo Bills 37-24–following their all-time best season finish at 17 wins and 2 losses!

And to bring my discussion about football and my interest in weekly status reports to a head, I’d like to share with you our eldest grandson Joey’s NFL Weekly Review with “Rob Crowe” – NFL 10:  Week 2

Two weeks in and I’m already scratching my head a little bit. Teams that I thought were going to be GREAT this year are below average or worse. Sorry Saints fans, you still stink away from the dome. I thought the Raiders wouldn’t suck. I didn’t think they would be good, just not suck. Sadly the Raiders are still the Raiders. I also thought the Cowboys would be historically bad, but they remembered how to hand the ball to Demarco Murray and have over achieved on defense. And don’t get me started on my Giants, for who, in spite of logic, I still cling to hope for. In any case, week 2…

 

1. Dear Oakland Raiders, I’ve always heard that everyone enjoys their own scent, but that was just offensive, or so says Charles Woodson, and I quote, “we suck,” and, “I’m embarrassed.” I’m embarrassed for him after the dump they took all over that game. i swear someone buttered the ball before that before that game because watching James Jones chase two consecutive fumbles off a single catch was a bit like watching a bunch of drunk guys chasing a greased up pig at the fair.

 

2. and speaking of embarrassing… hey Colin Kaepernick, why not show some modesty. I know, I know, Kyle fuller, Chris Conte, and Danny McCray are all famous athletes and you were a little star struck, but at least make them buy you dinner before you give it all away like that. Four turnovers, Really? no one likes a groupie.

 

3. On a related note, Bear fans and pundits, can we please stop pretending like Jay Cutler was the hero of that game… PLEEEEEZ! the defense, i mean Kapn K, bailed you out with four turnovers, and Brandon Marshall single-handedly carried that offense… and by that I mean he leaped through the air and made a one-handed circus catch for a TD followed by two more TD catches.

 

4. This just in, J.J. Watt apparently plays every position on the field. that’s right, he scored a touchdown from the tight end spot this Sunday.. and Oakland hangs their collective heads in shame… again.

 

5. In other news, the NFC ordered the refs of Monday night’s Eagles Colts game to refund their game checks and immediately take a trip to Lense Crafters. After missing a blatant pass interference call that resulted in T.Y. Hilton hitting the turf and a subsequent Andrew Luck interception the refs decided to call a phantom horse collar tackle of LeSean McCoy, allowing the eagles to tie the game at 27 all. this was a two score swing as the Colts were well within Vinatieri’s range which would have made it a minimum of 30-20 Colts.

 

6. having said that though, the sheer pace with which the Eagles are able to run plays while still basically being a run first offense is impressive. I was out of breath just watching them. I can only imagine what opposing defenses must feel like… probably similar to Jonah Hill after walking from the couch to the kitchen for a bag of Cheetohs. McCoy and Sproles are going to be a nightmare all year long.

 

7. This makes the colts 0-2. that’s right two of the teams expected to be in the thick of the playoff hunt have the same amount of wins as the Giants, Jags, and Raiders. Meanwhile the Buffalo Bills are undefeated.

 

8. Apparently the Colts-Eagles refs weren’t the only ones who got paid off this week. Marty Mornhinweg kamikazeed a 36 yard game tying TD pass on 4th and 4 and ended the Jets hope of an upset over the Green Bay Packers.

 

9. Seahawks fans across Seattle shed a tear as it was the first time in over three years that the hawks lost by more than a score. don’t get used to it though. These guys are too tough to let that happen again. and Sherman exposed? get real! he gave up three passes for less than fifty yards and zero TDs. I’m not impressed Keenan Allen.

 

10. there is a tombstone being placed in a field near Fed-Ex Field today. It reads R.I.P. RGIII’s career as a franchise QB.

If you like reading this every week then do me a favor please? Click the like button, or share, or like my page. Thanks and see you next week.

-Crowe

With all this being said I’d to close my post about our guys and their football by also adding that they stay fans of football and stay passionate in their faith because they continue to do good works for God’s people and their families. And by knowing that they have the following biblical verse in common with so many other faithful athletes:

Isaiah 40:30-31 – New International Version (NIV)

30 Even youths grow tired and weary,
and young men stumble and fall;
31 but those who hope in the Lord
will renew their strength.
They will soar on wings like eagles;
they will run and not grow weary,
they will walk and not be faint.

 

Native Americans, White People, and Scottish-Irish Emigrate to North Carolina


Native Americans

A recent blog post focused on my maternal great-grandmother Mary Susan MORRIS‘s family–our native american heritage through the Morris branch–and the freshly fallen bricks of a wall I had been up against for years.

White People

Not abandoning this wall, but continuing on, I returned to my maternal great grandfather–Grandmother Susan’s husband, John Carpenter Ford’s (1864-1961) family. Similarly, I found myself at yet another brick wall at his paternal grandfather, Henry Ford (1790-1830)–not the infamous innovator of the automobile industry.

Henry Ford’s birth and death have been recorded as North Carolina in many public family trees.  These trees also show that he and Peggy Rigsby had a son, Robert Jackson Ford, father of my great grandfather, John Carpenter Ford. Henry’s marriage to Peggy is documented in the North Carolina Marriage Index (1741-2004) as 5 Aug 1816 in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina.  Without any evidence to the contrary, we suffice that this Henry is my third great grandfather, who we also believe was of Scottish/Irish descent based upon the etymology of the surname Foard, Foord, and Ford as it became commonly spelled.

Scottish/Scotch-Irish Migration

The term “Scotch-Irish” is an Americanism, generally unknown in Scotland and Ireland, and rarely used by European historians. In American usage, it refers to people of Scottish descent who, having lived for a time in the north of Ireland, migrated in considerable numbers to the American colonies in the eighteenth century.

Scot Immigration USThe Scotch-Irish, or Ulster Scots had prospered in Ireland until changes in English policies led many to migrate to America, where most settled in Pennsylvania. They began to arrive in North Carolina in the 1730s, leaving Pennsylvania after crops were harvested in the fall and arriving in the Piedmont in time to plant winter crops and seedlings that they brought with them.

On small farms these Scotch-Irish settlers grew corn for home use and wheat and tobacco for use and for export. They raised livestock and drove them in large numbers to northern markets. Settlers built stores, grist mills, sawmills, and tanneries. Blacksmiths, carpenters, coopers, potters, rope makers, wagon makers, and wheelwrights established many local industries. Brewers, distillers, weavers, hatters, tailors, and others practiced their trades either in isolated homes or in shops in towns.

“The Guttenberg Project:  Scotland’s Mark on America,” published in 1921

In 1682, a number of Scottish nobility and aristocracy first left Scotland and settled in New Jersey and the Carolinas. During the following century a constant stream of emigrants both from Scotland and from Ulster, Ireland came to the colony.  The largest influx of Scots/Scots-Irish into North Carolina was in the form of Protestants–largely Presbyterian but also Anglican due to religious persecution.

Cape Fear is in the lower right.  The pin points to House Creek in Raleigh where my Ford ancestors lived.

The red arrow points to Cape Fear. The red pin points to House Creek in Raleigh where my Ford ancestors lived.

From 1715-1773 tens of thousands of Scots settled in North Carolina on or near the Cape Fear River. Cross Creek, now Fayetteville, was the center of these settlements. It was in this area of North Carolina that my Ford family’s history is first documented.  In fact, my 2nd great grandfather lived and died in the House Creek area of Raleigh, Wake County, and still today there are thousands of Fords who still live in North Carolina.

Gov. Gabriel Johnston, of the province of North Carolina from 1734 to 1752, appears to have done more to encourage the settlement of Scots in the colony than all its other colonial governors combined.

Between 1729 and 1740 scots were in Virginia. A strong infusion of Scottish blood in New York State came through settlements made there in response to a proclamation issued in 1735 by the Governor, inviting “loyal protestant Highlanders” to settle the lands between the Hudson River and the northern lakes.

The first Presbyterian Church was organized in Albany, New York, in 1760 by Scottish immigrants who had settled in that vicinity.

In 1773 Scots penetrated to and settled in Kentucky.  By 1790 seventy-five thousand people were in the region and Kentucky was admitted to the Federal Union in 1792.

According to the United States Historical Census Data Base (2002), the ethnic populations in the American Colonies of 1775 were:

English 48.7 %
African 20.0 %
Scottish/Scot-Irish 14.4 %
German 6.9 %
Scottish 6.6 %
Dutch 2.7 %
French 1.4 %
Swedish 0.6 %
Other 5.3 %

By 1779 they had crossed the Ohio River into the present state of Ohio. Between the years 1730 and 1775 the Scottish immigration into Pennsylvania often reached ten thousand a year.

Scotland immigration_tableIn 2000, the state of North Carolina had more citizens of Scottish ancestry than any other state or country.

And, like so many other of my posts that I have written while journeying through stories and searching for historical records that give me new and improved evidence about the life and times of our family’s ancestors, I must end today’s post here–with many questions still unanswered…until next time.

References:

The Guttenberg Project:  Scotland’s Mark on America

You Little Dickens!


MarySusanMorrisFordMy mom has told me a story about my relationship with my Cherokee maternal great-grandmother, Mary Susan Morris Ford, ever since I was old enough to talk. Unfortunately, I was only 14 months old when Grandma Susan passed at 73 years old.

The story goes like this.  My great-grandmother went to sleep one night and when she awoke the next morning she was completely blind probably due to glaucoma.  Despite her blindness her favorite pastimes were knitting and crocheting and I was highly interested in her and her hobbies.  However, when Grandma Susan would leave the room for any reason I would toddle over to her chair, grab her yarn and needles and either take off on a run or try to hide them under the seat where she had sat. I’m told Grandma Susan would chuckle each time, retrieve her goods and say to me, “You, little dickens!”

littledickensknittedmouseAccording to Answers.com, “Dickens” is a minced oath. It stands for Devil. A little Dickens is an imp. Used familiarly, it is usually affectionate.  The phrase “what the dickens” was coined by William Shakespeare and originated in The Merry Wives Of Windsor Act 3, scene 2, 18–23.

And to add irony to this story, little did anyone know that I would become the mother of “three little dickens,”–ah–Dickinson’s, that is.

CHEROKEE HISTORY

To my knowledge, no one in our past or present day family has researched its Cherokee heritage. However, mom at 87, often looks at her arms and says that they remind her of her Grandma Susan’s; “except grandma’s skin had more of a red hue to it”.   Mama also is the only family member alive who remembers her grandmother telling her that she was full-blooded Cherokee–a powerful detached tribe of the Iroquoian family. And Grandma Susan’s father, Gideon W. Morris, passed away when she was only 5. So, again, immediate family information about our Cherokee heritage was not handed down from generation to generation.

In my recent research, however, I discovered that the Cherokee Nation formerly held the mountain region of the south Alleghenies, in southwest Virginia, western North Carolina and South Carolina, north Georgia, east Tennessee, and northeast Alabama, and claiming even to the Ohio River when first they were first met by De Soto in 1540.  Our Morris family branch hailed from Virginia and North Carolina.

Cherokee wars and treaties

Seven clans are often mentioned in Cherokee ritual prayers and in the printed laws of the tribe. They seem to be connected with the “seven mother towns” of the Cherokee, described by Sir Alexander Cuming in 1730 as having each a chief, whose office was hereditary in the female line.

Numbering about 22,000 tribesmen in 200 villages throughout the area, a series of battles and agreements around the period of the Revolutionary War (1763-1787) effectively reduced Cherokee power and landholdings in Georgia, eastern Tennessee, and western North and South Carolina, freeing up this territory for speculation and settlement by the white man.

Today’s Cherokee Nation is the federally recognized government of the Cherokee people with sovereign status granted by treaty and law. Its capital is the W.W. Keeler Complex near Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The Cherokee Nation has operated under a constitutional form of government since 1827. Today there are more than 320,000 registered Cherokee citizens, making it the largest Native American tribe in the United States.  And, for now, this is where my story pauses.  That is, until I find new discoveries that can place my Morris family within a particular clan and village before 1798 when my third great grandfather, James Thomas Morris, was born in Virginia. James was Mary Susan’s grandfather.

157 Years Later: CSA Sgt. Gideon W. Morris–Our “Battle of Antietam” Survivor


Freshly Fallen Bricks of My Morris Family Wall

After searching to uncover more information about my maternal great grandmother’s (Mary Susan MORRIS Ford) family, I once again stumbled and fell upon freshly fallen bricks of a wall I had pushed against for many years.  Until now, I primarily had focused on the origins of my Native American heritage through the Morris branch.  And then, I immediately shifted my center as a result of revisiting my earlier research in Grandmother Susan’s tree.

Gideon W Morris HeadstoneTo refresh my memory, I reviewed data I had compiled about her father, Gideon W. Morris–my second great grandfather (1837/8-1880)–Virginia born and raised.  It was about 18 months ago when volunteer contributor Michael Hollingsworth first created a findagrave memorial page about Gideon W. Morris and I added his entries to my tree. My newest research, based upon Michael’s findagrave.com page, has helped me remove some significant bricks from my Morris Family wall–thank you, Michael.

It turns out that The Southern Historical Society, a public organization founded by Confederate Major General Dabney H. Maury in 1868-1869 documented Southern military and civilian viewpoints from the American Civil War until now. These were compiled into the Southern Historical Society Papers, published in the late 19th Century, comprising 52 volumes of articles written by Southern soldiers, officers, politicians, and civilians.  And among these papers and published online, when googling “Sergeant Gideon W Morris,”  I found the military history of my second great grandfather Sergeant Gideon W. Morris.

Gideon Morris’s Life in the Confederate States of America Infantry

At age 25 on April 23, 1861, Gideon enlisted in Virginia’s Infantry less than two weeks after the civil war officially began on April 12, 1861 at Fort Sumter, South Carolina.  He was a member of Company A of the 15th Virginia Infantry.

Battles Involving 15th Infantry

 

The Battle of Antietam/Sharpsburg

Drewry's Bluff-Fort Darling

Drewry’s Bluff at Fort Darling

In the Antietam/Sharpsburg Campaign (September 16-18,1862)  16 months after he enlisted, Sgt. Morris was captured on Wednesday,
September 17, 1862. The battle began just outside Sharpsburg early on the morning of September 17, 1862, when Union troops under General Joseph Hooker attacked the Confederates near the Dunker Church. Later, the fighting would move to the Sunken Road, and then to a bridge over Antietam Creek, across which troops under General Ambrose Burnside managed to fight their way only to be withdrawn again when rebel reinforcements arrived at the end of the day.  With a combined tally of dead, wounded, and missing at 22,717, this is the all-time bloodiest single-day battle in American history. Based upon those statistics, I would consider the capture on this day of Sgt. Morris to be one of his luckiest days in life.

Twenty months later, on Saturday, May 14, 1864, Sgt. Gideon Morris was wounded in action probably at Drewry’s Bluff at Fort Darling in Chesterfield County, Virginia.

And then, nearly one year later he was captured again on Saturday, April 11865, just 8 days before the Civil War came to its official end on  Sunday, April 9, 1865.

Gideon’s Private Life

Before Gideon’s enlistment in 1861, according to the 1860 Census, he and his wife, Mary J. Schaner, ten years his junior, and their first-born, one year old son Granville, J. Morris, were living in Mecklenburg, North Carolina.   Unfortunately, the enumerator failed to enter any occupations for the Morris’s.

The 1870 Census has Gideon and his wife, Mary J. Schaner and their one year old daughter, Florence, living back in the Marshall Ward of Richmond, and Gideon working as a lumber inspector.

My next tracer, The U.S. City Directories, shows Gideon and his family at 2404 E. Main Street, Richmond where he worked as a laborer.

The Census beginning on June 1, 1880, shows Gideon alive at age 43 or so, working as a carpenter and living in Raleigh, North Carolina with his wife, Mary, and his two daughters, Florence D., 10, and Mary Susan (my great-grandmother), age 5.  This explains why our Ford family knew so very little about Mary Susan’s ancestry.

And, aside from the  findagrave memorial page (noted above), to date, I have found no further information about Gideon Morris’s life or death.

A 2-minute Video Commemorating the Civil War’s Battle of Antietam and all those who lost their Lives or were Injured

The video below concludes a series of six two-minute segments from The Civil War’s Trust’s animated events of The Battle of Antietam.  To see the full series, click on this link.

References,Sources, and Other Notes:

Basic information from Southern Historical Society: Note: From an annotated roster of Company A, 15th Virginia Infantry by Captain M.W. Hazlewood, published originally in the Richmond Dispatch of 19 August 1894.

Southern Historical Society, and Rev. John William Jones, Robert Alonzo Brock, James Power Smith, editors, Southern Historical Society Papers, 52 Vols., Richmond: Southern Historical Society, 1876-1959, Vol. 21, pp. 48 – 54 [AotW citation 8853]

Why do Americans and Canadians Celebrate Labor Day?


Reflections my Past Labor Days

When I reflect on the meaning of Labor Day from my childhood years, I think: end of summer; back to school tomorrow; our family get together’s which always included outdoor picnics; softball, badminton and other games; watermelon, potato salad, hot dogs, hamburgers, fried chicken, ice cream, and cake. And, in my earlier years when my grandparents were living, it was the last day at the beach playing in the sand and riding the waves, plus all the other activities and goodies. My maternal grandmother, “Mam-ma” got a big kick out of playing the “one-armed bandits” at Eli’s Store in Chesapeake Beach–it’s now a mexican food restaurant and adjacent parking.  In fact, we live only a few miles away and regularly frequent the restaurant and walk the boardwalk. But, as a child, all I knew about labor day was everyone in our family had a day off from their regular jobs and routines where we could celebrate just spending time together and having fun.

So today, when none of our family regularly gathers for holidays the way we used to, I turned to YouTube to seek out the original and bigger meaning behind this occasion. Popping up first through Google was “TED” (Technology, Entertainment, Design)–a global set of conferences owned by the private non-profit Sapling Foundation, whose slogan is: “Ideas Worth Spreading.” And there I found TED-Ed’s Original educational video series which captures and amplifies the voices of the world’s greatest educators and animators. “Why do Americans and Canadians Celebrate Labor Day?” was right at the top of the search results. It’s author was Kenneth C. Davis, an American popular historian, whose second book Don’t Know Much About® History spent 35 consecutive weeks on The New York Times bestseller list in 1990 and launched the Don’t Know Much About®… series.

And without me telling you the whole story of Labor Day, I will say that the Big Apple in 1882 was the first state to celebrate it. And, as many other holidays that we celebrate, Labor Day did not come about easily and without strife.  But, there’s so much more to this story below…And, it just takes about four minutes to view.  I hope you enjoy.