Simeon Ford and Daughter, Lauren


A Portfolio of Paintings by Lauren Ford 0 comments Posted by Kristine at 8/22/2010 07:37:00 PM Madonna and Child From the cover of Life magazine, December 25, 1944 - this was the only color cover of Life during World War II. Adoration Lauren Ford transplants the scene of the Nativity to a barn in Connecticut much … Continue reading Simeon Ford and Daughter, Lauren

“So Much Wasted Time”


I dedicate this post to Chesapeake Church's Executive Pastor Ann Edwards.  I wish I could credit meditation and deep contemplation for it.  But in fact, it was this weekend's very poignant message "Isn't It Time I Stop Wasting My Life," delivered by Ann Edwards at Chesapeake Church in Huntingtown, Maryland, that inspired me to spread the … Continue reading “So Much Wasted Time”

Nostalgia – There Will Never Be Another Mayberry!


"Come sit a spell, take your shoes off...  While working extensively on my genealogy and blog sites over the past two weeks I had an epiphany--If I were asked to describe my life and times growing up what would I say or write?  Immediately, it came to me:  Mayberry and its mostly good family, friends, … Continue reading Nostalgia – There Will Never Be Another Mayberry!

“Christmas in 17th-century England and Virginia”


Guest Author:  Nancy Egloff, Jamestown Settlement Historian Christmas in 17th-Century England and Virginia Exploring English customs and the Lord of Misrule Along with their friends and relatives in England, the Englishmen who came to Jamestown in 1607 considered Christmas to be one of the most special times of the year. In England, the season lasted … Continue reading “Christmas in 17th-century England and Virginia”

The First Thanksgiving Took Place in Virginia, not Massachusetts


Remembering some of my earliest history lessons--Our teachers got it all wrong!  All those days at school coloring, cutting out and pasting turkeys, pilgrim shoes, hats, and hearing about the first Thanksgiving shared by pilgrims and "Indians"? Here's the real scoop on the first Thanksgiving celebration . AUTHOR: MATT BLITZ  PUBLISHED ON NOVEMBER 18, 2015 IN THE WASHINGTONIAN MAGAZINE … Continue reading The First Thanksgiving Took Place in Virginia, not Massachusetts

YOLO–Carpe Diem, Folks!


Amidst the agony and pain of observing my parents increasingly debilitating aging process, we also have experienced a sprinkling of moments that remind us of better days when all their faculties were present and they were high functioning adults who volunteered and thrived within their family, friends, and social circles. I remember my dad, Frank … Continue reading YOLO–Carpe Diem, Folks!

Rich man, poor man, beggar man, thief, Doctor, lawyer, Indian Chief!


Rich man, poor man, beggar man, thief, Doctor, lawyer, Indian Chief--that's the first line from one of my childhood jump rope rhymes.  I thought it appropriate for opening this post that connects farmers, merchants, lawyers, sailors, a kidnapper, and even a President, Indian Chief, and an Indian Princess who became famous for her peacekeeping powers … Continue reading Rich man, poor man, beggar man, thief, Doctor, lawyer, Indian Chief!

America’s Red Summer – 1919


As I continue to dig more deeply into my family's history, I am learning more about their life and times.  Today I received more leads and resources from the National Archives and The Wake County Historical Society.  I hope these help me find my third maternal great-grandfather, Henry Ford, who was from Wake County, North … Continue reading America’s Red Summer – 1919

Mashpee Indians in Massachusetts Sue for Recognition


I subscribe to Mass Moments daily posts about events in the history of Massachusetts.  I copied today's (October 17, 2017) slug because of its relevance to my ongoing research into my Native American heritage.  What's different about this article is this piece comes from our 20th-century history and not the 16th century, and shows that Native Americans … Continue reading Mashpee Indians in Massachusetts Sue for Recognition

They Migrated From Maryland to Virginia – Just 300 Years Apart


Our eldest son moved his family from Maryland to Lynchburg in Virginia's Southern Piedmont Valley about 12 years ago to allow his sons to attend Christian colleges there.  He knew little of the area's history but found a home and a job just outside Bedford County and the City of Lynchburg.  As it turns out, … Continue reading They Migrated From Maryland to Virginia – Just 300 Years Apart

“Wingapo” – Welcome, My Beloved Friend


"Welcome, my beloved friend" European colonists arriving in Virginia may have been greeted with, "Wingapo,"  (pronounced win-gà-po), which translated means "Welcome, my beloved Friend."  So we know that the State of Virginia's history did not begin in 1607. We are learning that Indians have lived in Virginia for thousands of years.  In fact, if you … Continue reading “Wingapo” – Welcome, My Beloved Friend

My Heritage: A View From The “Great” American Indian Wars


My post of January 12, 2013, mentioned my maternal great-grandfather, John Carpenter Ford, from Wake County, Raleigh, North Carolina.  John's U.S. Army Enlistment Records of August 14, 1888, show his date of birth as January 15, 1864, which would have been just one year before "The 'Great' American Indian Wars began (1865-1890). His enlistment record … Continue reading My Heritage: A View From The “Great” American Indian Wars

I Remain in the Thicket, Hoping to Learn from our Children


Just one month ago this week, I began writing this post about a two-month-old article I came across that was written by Victoria Prooday, an internationally-known educator, motivational speaker, registered Occupational Therapist, and founder and clinical director of a multidisciplinary clinic.  It speaks to a silent tragedy that is affecting our very own children all … Continue reading I Remain in the Thicket, Hoping to Learn from our Children

Does Art Imitate Life or Life More Often Imitate Art?


In recent years, several excellent historical drama series have emerged that depict the life and times of ancient peoples and cultures.  We sit back comfortably in our chairs, on our couches, or even lay back on our bed pillows and watch in high definition color on our flat screens as peoples' thirsts drive them forward … Continue reading Does Art Imitate Life or Life More Often Imitate Art?

Wharton’s – My Ancient Ancestors


Often when I'm researching family history, regardless of the branch, I feel a real connection and gain a greater understanding of familial traits and relationships.  Yet sometimes, especially in the ancient families' histories, the facts seem so very surreal; especially as they unfold through the mix of aristocracies, the haughty "blue-bloods," castles, manor houses, servants, … Continue reading Wharton’s – My Ancient Ancestors

Ancient Wharton’s “Rocky” Ascent to Nobility


At the close of my recent post Life and Times of Edward Boling and Mary Wharton, I stated that I must dig more deeply to learn about Mary Wharton's family's ancient beginnings.  Our first source was the Doomsday Book of 1086, where we discovered Wharton families in towns and civil parishes named after them in … Continue reading Ancient Wharton’s “Rocky” Ascent to Nobility

“We Live, We Love, We Let Go!”


A Harsh Reality This week our church family was once again struck by a harsh reality--that we live, we love, and then we must let go.  That is, we should never take life, family, friends or God for granted.  We always should live our lives as though today might be our last. Love God, Love … Continue reading “We Live, We Love, We Let Go!”

Life and Times of Edward Boling and Mary Wharton


Background Recently, I updated a surname report to cover all 12, 495 persons in my ancestral tree, which has grown from 10,772 since I produced my first post on surnames in 2014. Based upon my analysis of surnames, it turns out that my father's family was much larger than my mother's.  And, the gender ratio among … Continue reading Life and Times of Edward Boling and Mary Wharton

It’s Graduation Season – Whatever Happened To The Class of ’65?


Paying Homage to a Graduate for a Job Well Done!  This Sunday, we went with our daughter and two of our teenaged grandchildren to a high school graduation party to honor an outstanding senior from our church family whose parents have every right to be very proud of her scholastic accomplishments, God-given talents and exemplary … Continue reading It’s Graduation Season – Whatever Happened To The Class of ’65?

“Operation Rolling Thunder”


For many Vietnam War veterans, the hostile reception they received when they returned home from this war remains vivid in their hearts and minds. This past weekend, my husband Bob, now a spry 73, and a former Marine from the Vietnam War Era  (February 28, 1961 to May 7, 1975), was just one of about … Continue reading “Operation Rolling Thunder”